Best Freelance Websites 2018

These marketplaces websites have a broad sampling of freelance jobs. Whether you’re a writer, designer, developer, marketer, salesperson, photographer or virtually any other service provider, there are freelance jobs for you on these marketplaces.

 

1. Broxer.

Broxer is a Freelance Marketplace which provides digital buying-selling platform for freelancers to grow and buyers to get the job done at affordable costs. It’s an Indian Freelance platform and services start at just INR 250 or ₹250.

2. Fiverr.

Fiverr gets its name from its site design: every job starts at $5. It sounds low, but you can set up tiers above the base $5 option, which adds up fast! It’s also a great way to get started and build up your portfolio.

3. Upwork.

Once upon a time, there existed two leading platforms for landing freelance jobs: oDesk and Elance. Eventually, their two kingdoms combined to create one large peaceful marketplace for people to land freelance jobs from clients all over the world. Enter: Upwork. As a result, this freelance jobs site is huge. They have over 12 million freelancers and 5 million clients listing upwards of 3 million freelance jobs each year. Just about every freelancer can find their niche here, but beware: Upwork takes a 20% cut until you build up a regular relationship with a client. It’s very beginner friendly, but be prepared to take lower-priced freelance jobs through sites like Upwork, than you would from the more carefully curated marketplaces that focus on a specific niche.

 

4. Indeed.

Indeed collects all the jobs on the interwebs and puts them all in one place. They’re easy to search through, and looking specifically for remote jobs is a piece of cake. If you’re open to working at a local company, you can search that too. Best of all, it’s free!

5. College Recruiter.

Student or recent grad? Browse this site to see what kind of part time freelance jobs pop up within your degree. These are going to be great beginner jobs that will get you experience and, hopefully, contacts for future work.

6. Freelancer.

This site has a huge variety of projects, some formatted as hourly and some as contests – the only downside is that they only give 8 free applications before you have to pay the membership fee. The project fee is also a little different – pay between $3-5 or 3-5%, whichever is greater (one of the cheaper commission rates).

7. Guru.

Guru makes it easy to create a profile that shows off your experience, making it easier to be contacted by potential employers, while also wading through the massive amounts of job postings made every day. They give a decent amount of free applications, rationed by the year, and charge about 9% commission.

8. Craigslist.

Forget selling your grandma’s dusty couch, Craigslist has a pretty great job posting section too. You don’t get the security of a site that holds the client accountable, so it’s an excellent idea to set up a contract (or meet up in person, if possible), but most people posting are looking for work done as quick as possible. Here’s a hack if you want to look through remote jobs: go to the corresponding Craigslist for major cities and search for remote work that way. You’re welcome.

9. FlexJobs.

This is a really nice curated site for freelance jobs only – it’s sorted by the type you want, and you generally don’t have to worry about scams because they research the postings pretty thoroughly. As I’m sure you’ve guessed, it’s not free. Check out their free trial to see if you think it’s worth it!

The Best Websites for Writers to Get Freelance Jobs

You weave word magic, your sentences are sensational, your calls to action make people want to call their mothers to tell them they love them. Turn all that writing wizardry into some cold hard cash with these sites:

10. Freelance Writing Gigs.

The name isn’t winning any creative awards, but it gets the point across. This site is basically a well-curated job board that’s updated Monday to Friday with the hottest new clients willing to pay you actual money to write things. Sounds too good to be true, right?

11. Blogging Pro.

Despite the name, you can find everything from blogging to editing to general copywriting jobs here – they aggregate all the best writing jobs they can find to make them easy to find and search through on their site. Also, totally free!

12. Journalism Jobs.

If you have Dan Rather dreams, don’t let them die! Check out this job board that curates journalism jobs from around the web – along with other typical writing and editing gigs thrown in.

13. Morning Coffee Newsletter.

This is an easy one to sign up for, then you get an email every day with the latest and greatest freelance writing jobs. Totally free, and a great way to jumpstart your search.

14. Freelance Writing.

This source of writing jobs is excellent for freelancers all over the map, from brand spanking new to very experienced. It’s easy to filter for the type of job you want and the experience you have, and it’s totally free.

15. All Indie Writers.

This site has been around for years, and you can search for the jobs that are posted and subscribe to a feed based on keywords you like. It’s free to use and apply for jobs, and their layout makes it easy to compare the available projects by the client’s budget – it will even indicate when the budget is low.

15. Freedom With Writing.

Not only can you sign up for their newsletter with writing opportunities, you can actually submit to write for them. They pay well, but you’ll need to come up with a pretty good idea to pitch. If you have a concept you think will work well, it’s definitely worth a shot. While you’re waiting to hear back, you can always check out the opportunities in their newsletter too.

16. Media Bistro.

Media Bistro has a nice little variety of categories, which includes writing and editing. Their curated list features everything from book editing to PR content, so you’re sure to find a few things that fit your niche.

17. Paid to Blog.

Calling all bloggers! This site was thought up by a freelance writer who already went through the grind and wanted to come up with a better way. The good news is that they put together an extremely well-curated list of jobs to apply for, and they make writing jobs available for their site as well. The bad news is that it costs $30 a month to subscribe to. If you’re trying to get your freelance career off the ground on your lunch break, it could be more than worth it to invest a little money to save a lot of time.

18. Due.

We couldn’t leave out the technical writers! You can write helpful guides on invoicing, payments, blockchain currency and more. They’re looking for longform and well-researched posts, so it would be tough to break into as a newbie, but if you already have background knowledge in the area, it could definitely be worth your time.

The Best Websites for Designers to Get Freelance Jobs

You get paid to make the world a prettier place, one Helvetica logo at a time.

19. 99 Designs.

This site is set up in a bit of a different format than typical freelance sites, but it does work in the design context. Clients publish a contest, and designers submit their work as their application. The client chooses the design they like best, and the designer gets paid. I’m sure you’ve noticed the downside – if you don’t win, you don’t get paid. However, it can be an excellent way to build up your portfolio at the beginning, and if you’ll be doing work anyway, it can be a great resource.

20. Behance.

This isn’t a freelance job site per se, but it is something you need to do now. Like, right now right now. These kinds of sites help designers showcase their work, and because the site has a much higher DA than any personal website you’ll put together, your work has a higher chance of showing up early in the search engine based on your keywords. It’s a must for designers of any skill level, and something you need to get set up right away.

21. Dribbble.

See above – another way to get people’s attention and get your work in as many places as possible. The other benefit to these sites is that you’ll get feedback from other designers, and potential clients, on your work. Feedback is crucial to improvement, so accept it openly! Also, browse the other designers on the site to get a feel for what kind of projects you like and what you may want to work on in the future.

22. Angel List.

If you’ve swallowed the start-up pill and your dream is to someday work for a cool, up and coming company, start your path with Angel List. Start-up companies of all kinds search for talent on Angel List, from established to brand new, so you can get a taste of the start-up culture and possibly get your foot in the door for long term employment.

23. Art Wanted.

You got art? They want art! If you’re more of a graphic designer or digital illustrator (or even if you’re pretty skilled already on the side), you can put up your masterpieces on Art Wanted. People can browse them by keywords, and there’s always the potential for connecting with clients!

24. Design Crowd.

This is another marketplace similar to 99 Designs, with somewhat fewer designers active on the site. They also have contests, but pay out lower amounts. Those are actually both advantages for new designers, as there is less competition from very experienced designers, and you’re more likely to be selected.

25. Envato Studio.

Envato Studio’s most popular category is logos, so if that’s your thing, start here. They’re also known for very fast turn-around and an easy-to-use platform, both win-wins for beginners!

27. Coroflot.

If you’re a bit more experienced but need to break into the freelancing world quickly, this setup may be the best for you. On Coroflot, you post your portfolio, and clients post the projects they need. The difference here is that Coroflot is the go-between, setting up connections between the freelancers and clients themselves.

28. Smashing Magazine.

This is another great job board, and it’s a great resource for both developers and designers to utilize. It comes with the time cost of sorting through the postings yourself, but it’s easy to find freelancing jobs with the time commitment you want.

29. CrowdSPRING.

This is solely for designers and “creatives,” – which, translated, encompasses every type of design from general graphic design to logo design. It’s also free for freelancers and very easy to sign up for – no waiting list or invite-code necessary.

The Best Websites for Developers to Get Freelance Jobs

It’s just like in the movies – you smash your fingers on the keyboard at lightning speed, say some techy mumbo-jumbo words and you’ve hacked your way through the employment firewall to land yourself a great gig. Easy.

As a side note, a lot of the sites listed for designers also provide work for developers, and vice versa, as people lump them together sometimes, so check out the list above as well.

30. Work Mob.

Work Mob is just for developers, and has an added focus on networking, which is great for beginners. They want their freelancers to be more like a community, and they work to facilitate the networking by connecting freelancers with clients and other freelancers like themselves.

31. Joomlancers.

If you’re a tech wizard and you’re chomping at the bit, go to Joomlancer first. They have a super fast sign up process, and you can pretty much immediately start bidding on jobs. They do focus on mostly intermediate to advanced software projects, though, so not a great place for beginners.

32. Rent a Coder.

Pretty self-explanatory – clients that are looking for programmers, developers, and even designers will go to Rent a Coder to. . . well. . .rent a coder. Also, free to sign up!

33. 10x Management.

This site is pretty broad in their “tech” allowances, and looks for all sorts of freelancers, from developers to cybersecurity gurus. This is a great place to start if you have a niche tech specialty, or you have an interest and want to see the possibilities.

34. Gigster.

Gigster is also tech tech tech. Software designers, web designers, even app developers can find their home on Gigster. They have a screening process, which can make it tough to be accepted, but they use AI to match freelancers with projects, which is just plain cool. If you have some experience, this is the one to check out.

35. Talent Cupboard.

So if you’re reading these and realizing you don’t have quite as much experience as you thought you did, there’s no reason you can’t get started right away – you just need to get started on improving your skills. Talent Cupboard is a great resource for necessities like your digital resume and finding the right clients.

36. Codeable.

WordPress experts, this is an excellent place to start. Codeable focuses on offering their clients everything from WordPress themes to plugins – and that’s it. They’re literally just a resource for people to find WordPress experts, so your task of finding the right clients just got a lot easier.

37. Programmer Meet Designer.

This site brings together every type of freelancer needed to make a website great, including programmers, developers, and designers. It’s a pretty easy job board to search through, highlighting budget, skill set required, and deadline.

The Best Websites for Photographers to Get Freelance Jobs

You can often be seen with a camera that sports a lens slightly larger than your head, that can probably only be used in one scenario (but it’s totally necessary, you swear). Instead of collecting all the likes on Facebook, collect all the cold hard cash on these sites.

38. Craigslist.

We listed this in the beginning general section, but this applies really well for photographers so we wanted to repeat it here. There are always models looking to build up their portfolio, and will often bring everything to set, just looking for a fellow aspiring talent – you. It can be fun and free, and just what your sparse portfolio needs.

39. Airbnb.

Weren’t expecting to see this on the list, were you? Airbnb employs photographers to visit homes and photograph them for “verified” photos for their site. Check to see if they’re hiring in your region – it can be a fun way to travel around and get paid for it.

40. The Creative Loft.

This is a job board solely for photographers, so you’ll find your home here without having to dig through other random posts. Hundreds of jobs are posted every day, and can be freelance, part-time, or full-time.

41. Cruise Ship Jobs.

Probably another surprise on the list. Did you know that the ice cream machines on a lot of cruise ships operate 24/7? Do we really have to sell you further? This site is the perfect entryway to travel photography – and ice cream, like, all the time.

42. Photography Jobs Central.

This is a subset of Creative Jobs Central, a fairly typical freelance photography marketplace. Their premium membership does cost money, but they have over a thousand actively posting companies and they virtually guarantee that you will have jobs available in your area. It also weeds out amateurs and reduces competition, which can be worth it if you have a little extra to spend. It’s free to join and search through what they offer, so explore it before committing.

43. Journalism Jobs.

Every great story needs a great picture to go with it, and if you’re looking to break into the photojournalism biz, start here. All types of journalism jobs are posted here, not just writing!

44. Greatlance.

Greatlance is a pretty typical job board, where clients post projects they’re seeking freelancers for – photographers included. It’s free and fast, and you can start applying right away.

45. Photography Jobs Finder.

Are you, perhaps, trying to find photography jobs? Congratulations, you’re their target market. Jokes aside, this is another useful job board to search through all the photography jobs posted, as well as being able to upload your resume so clients can find you.

46. Photography Jobs Online.

This one is a bit different, as it’s more of a marketplace for your photos, not for jobs. If you have a backlog of photos that you want to try and make money from, try submitting them here first and see what happens.

47. Freelance Photographer Jobs.

These websites get straight to the point, don’t they? This is an aggregate job board of postings from around the web, but the benefit to this one is that it’s curated – they don’t just dump whatever they find into the mix.

The Best Websites for Marketers to Get Freelance Jobs

Seeing companies or start-ups with great ideas and products but no idea how to sell them kills you inside a little bit. You know how to help them – get paid for it. Marketers of all kinds tend to be folded into the big freelance marketplaces, so check all the usual suspects first (Upwork, Guru, etc.). However, there are a few more that speak to some marketing specializations.

48. People Per Hour.

This one is great for marketers, as well as SEO folks and software engineers. PPH takes care of just about everything in the process, but only allows for 15 applications before charging. Browsing is free though, so totally worth it to send out some feelers and see if you think it’s worth it.

49. Traction.

This is great if you want to jump in and get connected with a brand right away. They’ll help make connections for you with their advertising and brand partners as a marketer, depending on your skillset and expertise.

50. CloudPeeps.

If you have a great portfolio and feel like you have the experience to start at a higher level, CloudPeeps may be for you. They’re a bit more exclusive, which makes it harder to join but easier to get jobs if you do get accepted. They focus on marketing, social media, and general copywriting. Worth it to check out!

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